The Role of a Father

Image courtesy of lafamiliapawn.com

The role of a father is vital and paramount in determining how our children turn out. Don’t get me wrong, a mother’s role is as important in any family, hands down, but studies have shown that when a father is missing from a household, the likelihood of the children, especially the boys, acting out increases.

Did you know that:

  • the frequency of fathers that read to their children increases their children’s interest in books
  • fathers exert greater education influence than mothers on boys’ educational choices
  • fathers who are involved, nurturing and playful with their infants have children with highers IQs as well as better linguistic and cognitive capacities
  • 80% of rapists motivated with displaced anger come from fatherless homes. ¬†(Criminal Justice & Behavior Vol 14. p 403-26)
  • 70% of juveniles in state operated institutions come from fatherless homes (U.S. Dept of Justice, Special Report, 1988)
  • 85% of youths in prison grew up in fatherless homes

So how can we address this problem?

Firstly, the decision to have a child should be thought through in its entirety with your partner. Children are not accessories you pick up at the store. If you decide to become a parent, that child is your responsibility. You must do all that you can to ensure that that child has a bright and positive future. Parents should listen to their children. Give them chores at all levels to teach responsibility. Spend time doing the things they love to do — if the child is more interested in the performing arts, don’t force him/her to watch football every Sunday.

In closing, I leave you with two quotes:

It is not what you do for your children, but what you have taught them to do for themselves that will make them successful human beings.

~Ann Landers

The most important thing a father can do for his children is to love their mother.

~Theodore Hesburgh

 

Until next time…Namaste!

 

The Pound of Flesh

Check out this sexy poem. ūüôā

P.S. No kids allowed.

roxanaya

PicsArt_1381789996402

I gambled with hearts of men

They thought they would get the ultimate prize

That thing I possessed- My special emblem

But it was all to their demise, they would not get this prize.

It was different though when I met you

You caught my attention when my eyes were misty blue

I was caught up in your lust.

In my mind it felt so just.

………

Oh baby! Yes right there!

I love it when you pull my hair!

Soft wet kisses so sweet as a candy cane.

Oh, I’m trying my best to abstain

But from you I cannot refrain

When you kiss me high and kiss me low

Anywhere you do it, it feels like I’m about to blow.

You hold my hands and enter soft terrains

My lips open and is filled with a kiss.

As you continue, it begins to rain-

In places I’ve never…

View original post 159 more words

What Is Love?

Image courtesy of fanpop.com

A shoulder to lean on...
A comforter...
A healer...
A destroyer...
Kindness in this cruel world...
It makes you be who you are..
It's pride-less...
It's self-less...
It's never-ending...
It's all flowing...
It's kind...
It's patient...
It's tolerant...
It's impulsive...

It’s saying the right thing at the right moment.

It’s that warm embrace.

The kiss on the forehead.

The crazy pet peeves.

The long strolls, holding hands.

The PDAs (covers face).

The time spent together doing nothing. Just relaxing in each others arms.

Unequally Yoked

Image courtesy of awordywoman.com

2 Corinthians 6:14 says:

14. Do not be bound together with unbelievers; for what partnership have righteousness and lawlessness, or what fellowship has light with darkness?

15. Or what harmony has Christ with Belial, or what has a believer in common with an unbeliever?

That passage is so rigid. Is it impossible for a non-christian to be with a christian and have a healthy relationship? I find that some of the text in the bible is a bit extreme. For example, in the above passage, unbelievers¬†(hate that word because you can be a believer but not a christian) non-Christians are described as lawless and dark. I haven’t done a survey or gathered statistical data on the issue, but I’m sure that there are some really pure at heart non-Christians in the world. Some even purer that Christians (thunder crackling).

So I asked someone to explain this strict passage and they said that when you’re in an unequally yoked relationship (a christian and a non-christian), though the relationship might be great, you [the christian] will not grow “spiritually”. For example, when the christian in the relationship is falling short in faith, what can the non-christian do? They will not be able to offer that spiritual support rock that the christian needs. The non-christian cannot intercede on their partner’s behalf because he/she lacks the spiritual conviction needed to do so. Hmm…

What are your thoughts on the matter?

Until next time….namaste!

Vous √™tes nos femmes

OK, so you guys might remember in some distant post¬†I mentioned that I will be studying French. Well, I still am. And it’s so much fun. I am teaching myself through this awesome website — www.duolinguo.com. You can learn other languages on it as well like Spanish, German, Italian etc.

Anyway, the title — vous √™tes nos femmes,¬†translates to “You are our wives”. Someone (who from here henceforth, we shall call SmartGuy) commented:

General rule I find works: if it’s sounding a bit misogynistic/chauvinistic to say “woman/women”, “wife/wives” is probably a more appropriate translation.

 

I thought to myself, either SmartGuy doesn’t understand the meaning of the word misogyny, or he/she wants to appear smart. So, because I’m just an¬†average Joe, I decided to look up the definition of the word:

mi·sog·y·ny

noun¬†\m…ô-ňąs√§-j…ô-nńď\

 

: reflecting or exhibiting hatred, dislike, mistrust, or

mistreatment of women.

 

Still perplexed by the sheer complexity of SmartGuys analysis, I saw this comment from (we’ll call this person NormalGuy):

I totally disagree that “our women” is misogynistic. In fact, the presumption that the word “our” (possessive) converts women to wives is what is misogynistic. What would I do if I were speaking at a gathering of women professionals, and I wanted to say something like: “You, the members of this organization, you are our women, and we hope…” I hear stuff like this all the time. “Wives” is clearly inappropriate in this context.

 

I agree with NormalGuy’s point. That loose translation would be offensive in certain setting. For years, women have fought to be acknowledged as men’s equal and after all they have accomplished with regards to equality, to be labeled as mere “wives” on a whim would just be intolerable.

Feel free to chime in.

Until next time…Namaste!